GLASS ALUMNI

Chris Mosley

Scientific Glass Technology, A.A.S., 2016

Chris Mosley - Scientific Glass Technology, A.A.S., 2016

Upon graduating with a degree in Scientific Glass Technology in 2016, Chris Mosley relocated to California for position making projector bulbs at Philips Lighting.

Over the ensuing six years, Chris has continued to hone his skills at technology and research companies in the Golden State. Just recently, he became a glassblower at Thermo Fisher Scientific in Scotts Valley. “I do glass-to-metal seals,” he said. “I also have my own glass business where I do art and design glass commission projects.”

What does he look forward to the most each day? “Being able to create unique and specialty glass projects with my hands,” he said.

Chris decided early in life to pursue a glass career. “I was able to watch a video about it back in high school,” he recalled. “In 2006, it came to me in a dream. In the dream, I was selling work at a gallery auction.”

After graduating from high school, he attended the Art Institute of Atlanta, graduating with an associate degree in Graphic Design in 2005.

Before enrolling at SCC in 2013, he worked in an art community called the Goat Farm, making designer books for furniture showrooms. “This was the first time I had the opportunity to work surrounded by accomplished artists, and it gave me a window into many different examples of what success as an artist could look like.”

Before Chris enrolled at SCC, an apprenticeship with a glassblower in Atlanta opened his eyes to the immense possibilities in glass. “That moment changed my life forever. I became hooked on glassblowing and realized I had found the medium I wanted to grow and create in for the rest of my life.”

His proudest moment during his SCC years was interning at the prestigious Corning Museum of Glass in the summer of 2014. “I gave talks about fiber optics and glass stress, as well as flameworking demonstrations 11 times per day.”

His advice to prospective and current SCC students: “Learn as much as you can about all industries that use glass. Focus all your time on the glass center more than a home studio. Submit for every glass scholarship and program the school has to offer.”

Chris pointed out that pursuing a glass career means being a lifelong learner. “Glass is a medium that you can never master,” he said. “You can always grow and learn something new. The more you empty your cup and diversify your knowledge, the better your chances are to create opportunities to be able to make an amazing living for yourself in this industry.”

Visit Chris’s website at www.mozeart.com.

 

Chris Mosley in his own words:

“I was born in 1984 in Rochester, upstate NY. Always a creative kid, I got lost doodling in school, and somehow knew, ever since I was 12 years old, that creating was going to be an important part of my life.

“The first step on this path was attending college at the Art Institute of Atlantic for Graphic Design at 18. After graduating with an Associate’s Degree in Graphic Design in 2005, I explored my voice and different mediums as an artist over the next 5 years, while working all different types of jobs to pay the bills. In 2011, I got a job in an art community called the Goat Farm, making designer books for furniture showrooms. This was the first time I had the opportunity to work surrounded by accomplished artists, and it gave me a window into many different examples of what success as an artist could look like. I knew I hadn’t found my medium yet, and needed to keep trying things, so I reached out to a glassblower in the 4th Ward in Atlanta and asked for an apprenticeship. That moment changed my life forever. I became hooked on glassblowing and realized I had found the medium I wanted to grow and create in for the rest of my life.

“This certainly sparked a laser focus that consumed me for the next seven years. I had to learn everything about this material and become masterful at my craft. “In 2013 I began studies in the Scientific Glass and Glass Art Program at Salem Community College. The next summer in 2014 I interned at the prestigious Corning Museum of Glass, where I gave talks about Fiber Optics and Glass Stress, as well as Flameworking demonstrations 11 times a day.

“In the summer of 2015 I got to take my work deeper by traveling all over the East Coast and blowing glass with different artists. I then took a risk, packing up everything I had and moving across the country to LA with my girlfriend at the time, to take a position at Philips Lighting, making projector bulbs.

“After a few years, I hit a tough moment in my glass work, clarifying my voice as an artist, when my girlfriend walked out on me suddenly, and I was left alone in Los Angeles. Though it was a difficult moment, it gave me the priceless gift of having no distractions and being able to focus entirely on my passion and ambition. This ended up being an incredible time for me, in which I put everything into chasing my dreams.

“Hustling as a black artist was not easy – I worked for other artist studios while continuing to grow my own art and trying to keep the lights on. Finally, the universe gave me a gift. I got an email from a hiring director about a glass position in Orange County making measuring devices. After the interview, I realized I was over-qualified for the job, and more importantly, that I had been selling myself way too short and putting myself out there for way less than I was worth. With new confidence in my value, skill and knowledge, I started applying for high-paying glass jobs. Within a week, I applied for a position at Palo Alto Research Center (PARC) in Silicon Valley, a company with a deep history of investing and innovation. I got a phone interview, and a week later flew up to the Bay Area for an in-person interview. I had a strong feeling it was meant to be. I believed in myself and I got the job.”

1/30/22